Wednesday, October 01, 2014

ANTICIPATE - MEMORY PROJECT DAY 2

(verb) 
to look ahead with pleasure
to look forward to something

The thing I looked forward to the most when I was a child was going to school the day after getting new shoes or a new outfit.  Getting new shoes or a new outfit was a big deal back in  the 60's.  It is something that happened maybe two or three times a year, usually coinciding with a birthday, the start of school, or Christmas.  And occasionally, it happened when a neighbor delivered a bag of hand-me-downs.  I would actually go to bed early in hopes of getting to the tomorrow more quickly.   




Yes, I was even excited about this outfit, mainly because it was store bought.  
My mother made almost all of our clothing, so this outfit was very special.
Too bad you cannot see the flared purple mini skirt and the very wide plaid belt.  
I assure you that this was a 60's fashion statement. 
I cannot say the same about the hair.  My mother also was our beautician.
As a matter of fact, she was the family and neighborhood beautician.
Self-taught, I assure you.

Some things never change.  As an adult, when I worked full-time, having something new to wear actually had me look forward to getting up and out early instead of dreading it.
  
All posts from the 31 Words project can be found here.

24 comments:

Lisa Balough said...

At age four, I received the first pets I remember a couple of goldfish. I anticipated how much fun they would be. My Mom carefully explained everything to me about pet ownership and I was proud of my newfound knowledge. After a day or two when we had had all the fun I could think of together, my goldfish and I, a new game popped into my head. As my mother tells it, I ran into the kitchen proclaiming excitedly about how my fish were dancing on the rug! My parents swiftly scooped them up and re-deposited them in the fishbowl. I then received my second lesson on fish. They breathe water, not air!

martinealison said...

Bonjour,

Il est vrai que, différemment des enfants d'aujourd'hui, je n'avais pas grand chose comme garde-robe ! Une pour la semaine et puis celle du dimanche !
Bel article...

Gros bisous ☼

Heather Sparks said...

Childhood is full of anticipation! Kids anxiously anticipate each new day and activity. It's part of the beauty and innocence of childhood, I believe. What I remember anticipating frequently was the new sibling's arrival. What day would it decide to come? Would it be another girl or a boy? What "H" name would Dad and Mom decide on if it was another girl? Who would be staying with us while Mom was at the hospital? What would the new baby look like?? I couldn't wait for each new baby to makes it's appearance. I would hold the baby for hours if Mom would let me. I remember Mon being asked if the kids "still actually get excited to have a new sibling? Aren't they used to it by now?" Dad and Mom led us by example to eagerly welcome and cherish new life. I don't ever recall any of us ever being disappointed or bored with the idea of another baby in the house. We looked forward to that day as much as we did Christmas. We all still are each others biggest cheerleaders when a new nephew or neice is announced. I hope I can instill that same love for life into my children .

Sabrina said...

When I was 7 or 8 years old, my parents went out of town for two weeks to work a youth camp 1200 miles away. My mom had arranged for my sister and I to stay with four or five families during that time. The plan was to spend a couple nights here and there throughout the fourteen days. It was a genius idea, because we never got bored. The first couple nights were at my grandparents house, and both mornings we woke up, there was a small gift and letter from my parents presented to us at breakfast. I remember feeling special that they would try to make our first couple nights away from them easier. When we went to our friend's house for a couple nights, the gifts and letters followed us. Every single morning my parents where away, there would be a letter and surprise waiting for us, no matter where we were staying. I remember feeling amazed that mom took the time to deliver these items to each family secretly before they left. After day four and five, I started to anticipate these letters. I don't remember what any of them said and I definitely don't remember what any of the gifts were, but I do remember feeling more loved by my parents than ever before.

Mel said...

As I child, I always anticipated lazy summer days. I loved nothing more than waking up to the smell of the warm, summer breeze blowing through my bedroom window. As the sun kissed me awake, I'd roll over and find the book I'd been reading until the wee hours of the morning. For the next couple of hours, I'd read. After closing the cover of yet another book (I read one a day), I'd get up and eat and do chores. After that, the afternoon was mine. I'd stroll out to our big lawn, high on the hill, overlooking the brook. As I sat and watched the clouds go by, I'd reflect on all I'd read the evening and morning before. As the afternoon sun beat down, I'd begin thinking, with anticipation, of which of the stack of books I'd begin reading once the sun set.
Just now · Edited · Like

Kolein said...

Sitting on the basement floor in my make shift bedroom. Large calendar in hand, Sharpie nearby. Crossing off each day as it passed. During the day I was managing a tall girls shop in Lane Bryant. It was the summer of 1983. I was 19. One of my dreams was about to happen. Soon. It couldn't happen soon enough. However, I could wile away hours daydreaming about life. This time I was in hot pursuit of it. Secretively. I didn't do secret very well, usually. But this was a plan. One, no one was going to thwart. I was moving to NYC. I dreamed about it in my mind for long enough. Now it was on paper. I filled out all the necessary applications for school in NJ just across the river from Frank's song. How many times did I sing that song? In a few weeks time I was going to wake up in a city that never sleeps. Oh, my parents? They didn't have a clue about this move. They knew about the idea, since I was about 7. I was called upstairs for dinner. We all sat around the table. Mom, on one end. Dad, on the other. My younger siblings and their rivalry at each side. And me. 19 year old Me. In between bites of Chicken Paprikash I spilled the beans. My mother almost died. Literally. Right there at the table. She always thought my freedom spirit was of some evil force - someone made me do it. My dad, in his calm manner with a twinkle in his eye, asked all the proper and responsible questions. Where was I going to live? Did I have enough money? Stroking my mother with words that it IT would be alright. She didn't finish her dinner that night. I think she threw it in the sink and ran in her room. She was nuts. Dad remained calm. We even talked of getting a supply of boxes to pack all my stuff, and tape. "Don't forget to label everything," he advised. I went downstairs. One of the deepest breaths from the existence of my being was swallowed in, and exhaled. New York, New York!

Denise Voccola said...

Translation form martinealison:
hello,

It is true that, unlike the children of today, I did not have as much wardrobe! For a week and then the Sunday!
Nice article ...

Big kisses ☼

Lisa Balough said...

I'm trying really hard to recall something from my years of lessons in French. I think this says something about children today having a whole wardrobe to choose from while you had one dress for the week and another for Sunday. Am I close?

Denise Voccola said...

I included the translation, Lisa! You are so funny!

Sonya Tichenor said...

So glad this was posted last night so I had all night to mull it over. When I was about 5, I woke up one Easter morning to 12 brightly colored hardboiled eggs in a tin tray in the living room. Before this time, there had been no visit from the Easter bunny. So this was a surprise! No anticipation here. But there sure was for every Easter after that! Except, the Easter bunny only made random visits to our house. Some years he came, and others, no. I guess there is something to the behavior modification technique of random reward, because I ALWAYS anticipated Easter morning in case there was a surprise. I don't remember being terribly disappointed if there was no Easter delivery, but I do remember being THRILLED when my anticipation was rewarded! I have dutifully carried on the random reward with my children in the form of the Tooth Fairy.

Jen said...

No matter how hard I tried to 'come up' with another memory, all I can think about is Christmas. (I didn't want to write about Christmas in case there was a really Christmas-y word later. Haha silly me) moving on... The Christmas of second grade I had been hearing crazy rumors of Santa not being real. Of course, my detective-minded self decided that I would just find out and settle this once for all. That year we spent Christmas at a cabin in a state park in Georgia. We packed up all the presents and decorations and bought a $1 tree at Walmart. Christmas Eve came and I went to bed. My parents came in and checked on me to be sure I was asleep. Since I'm so good at playing opossum, they believed I was. For some reason they didn't close my door all the way, so I was able to sneak out of bed and peek through the crack and watch my parents bring out the Santa presents, including the prettiest bike is ever seen (see previous bike memory for more details HA!��) They finally went to bed but I was so excited I couldn't fall asleep. So I get up and flush the toilet like the little sneak that I was so they'd think I'd gotten up to use the bathroom. Then I went in to their room exclaiming that Santa had already come! They were suspicious but we went to the living room anyways. It finally comes out that I watched them and now know the truth of Santa. Mom balls her eyes out. Dad, on the other hand, says okay, if Santa isn't real, how did the bike get here? It wasn't in the van on the way here, was it? (No) You didn't see us buy it here did you? (No) then tell us how it got here. (.......) I had no idea. :)

Karen Pashley said...

Day 2…Anticipate

Kids anticipate lots of things. Christmas morning, their birthday party, the first day of school. My first recollection of anticipating something was a bit darker, and kind of funny now that I know about such things. You see, when I was six, I was convinced that death was at my door and I anticipated being long gone before I hit the second grade.

My grandma was babysitting my brood of siblings and me one evening. She and the rest of the litter watched TV in the living room, while I, the older and more curious of the bunch, sat on the kitchen floor, sucking on coins. I know, totally gross. But each one had a peculiar tangy taste that I found, well, appealing. As I tossed a nickel around in my mouth, I lost control of the little sucker and down my pipe it went. I choked, gasped, slammed my fists on the linoleum, hoping Grandma would come to my rescue. My gasps went unnoticed, drowned out by an episode of Gunsmoke blaring in the other room.

I was unable to breathe. The lights got fuzzy and dim. I was on my way out. I lay on the cold kitchen floor and waited for death.

But then…a miracle! I swallowed that shiny 5 cent piece! I felt the metal slide all the way down to my tiny tummy.

Weary from the incident, I went straight to my bed and covered up. Granny came in and asked if I was sick. No, I answered. But in my mind, fear was growing by the second. Would the nickel do me in? What if it poisoned me or blocked my tummy tube or worse, what if it got in my vein and went to my heart???

My six year old understanding of the inner workings of the body didn’t take into account that what goes in must come out.

Days turned into weeks. Weeks into months. Every day, I expected to become violently ill from the intruder in my tummy. Every night I lay awake, sweating, heart pounding, wishing I had the nerve to tell someone the sad fact. That I was dying. I just couldn’t bring myself to tell my mom, or anyone. What if they panicked? What if they rushed me to the hospital and I had to have my tummy cut open??

Three months after the incident, I got up the nerve to break the terrible news to Mom. I crawled onto her lap as she read a cozy mystery, and told her the whole story. She wrapped her arms around me and explained that the nickel was long gone. The relief swept over me and I sobbed and sobbed while she rocked me.

This memory serves as a reminder that children often bottle up emotions we adults are not aware of. To be mindful and sensitive to the imaginations of a child is wise indeed. ☺

Niki Carroll said...

I always loved going to my papaw's for Thanksgiving and Christmas. I couldn't wait for this time of year! All of my cousins would be there and we would beg my aunt Robin to let us all stay all night. She always gave in. We would all, including aunt Robin, stay up all night playing board games. I remember that we would laugh so hard that someone always peed their pants. �� we always had so much fun. I still get excited when I think about all the good times we had.

MsHouse121 said...

When I think back to my childhood some of the sweetest memories I have are cooking with my mother and grandmothers especially as the holidays grew near. Anticipating the holiday cooking season was so exciting to me! For thanks giving I always enjoyed cooking thanksgiving meals with my Mamaw Bare, Hessie. She would always let me help prepare the turkey, oyster dressing and make the homemade from scratch thanksgiving rolls. I would lie awake all night waiting for the alarm to go off at 5:00 am. After several years of just getting to help at age ten I finally got to prepare the turkey all by myself with the exception of putting the turkey in the oven and getting it out! I was so proud as we set that pretty bird on our Thanksgiving table! Oh and the rolls had to be made with such care, mamaw would make sure you did each and every step just so so treating the dough so delicately so each roll was tender . Those warm buttered rolls would just melt in your mouth. Just as soon at Thanksgiving day was over then came the anticipation of the girls weekend of Christmas candy making with my mom, sister and Mamaw Rhea, Dovie. Yes, friends Hessie and Dovie were my grandmother's real names, Laughing. Mamaw Dovie would lead us in a cooking spree of Peanut butter bon bons, old fashion peanut butter rolls, all different types of fudge, butter scotch candies, pull candy and mint candies. Mom would always make all kinds of Christmas cookies with me and my siblings, my favorite cookie she made with us was the stain glass cookies. Then I would get excited anticipating the making of Christmas Dinner. Oh I could go on and on, but I will spare you all! These memories always make my heart smile and I ponder on them a lot. I think of my grandmothers often and miss them very much!

Lisa Biery said...

Day 2. Anticipate. Late 1980s and I needed the Barbie Turquoise car for Christmas. I don't remember what kind of car it was but it had shiny wheels and was turquoise. Barbie and Ken needed another way to get from the mansion to the pool. About a week before Christmas I noticed a newly wrapped gift under the tree. IT WAS THE CAR! I just knew it. It had to the turquoise car. I couldn't wait...so I didn't. When no one was around I decided to sneakily unwrap one end of the package...and there it was. So I wrapped it back up and went to bed. I felt horrible about what I did and told my mom. Lesson learned.

Anticipation got the better of me that day. I couldn't practice patience and just wait. As an adult I find myself becoming anxious, anticipating the next moment, day, event, etc., causing me to get overwhelmed and sometimes a little crazy. I often have to remind myself to just to be in the moment...anticipation doesn't go away but I can change the spin that I put on it- pulling out the positive- anticipating the sunrise and the joy that comes in the breath of a new day. Anticipating the sound of little feet that come to wake me in the morning. The smell of the first morning cup of coffee, bed head, and froggy voices. The list goes on. Anticipate. Not so much a memory, but a feeling that is with me always.

Bonita said...

I would lie beside the Christmas tree on Christmas Eve and anticipate how wonderful it was going to be to open the presents. I particularly remember the year when I knew that hardback versions of the Anne of Green Gables series were under the tree. The waiting was torture!

Liza Rutherford said...

Anticipate... My earliest memory of experiencing anticipation involves the birth of my little sister. When my mom was pregnant, I was 4 years old and told everyone I was going to have another little brother named Matthew! I apparently had issues with losing my "only child" status when my then 2 year old brother was born. My parents found me standing on him and beating him a few times, and they tell me I wouldn't even let my mom touch me after she came home from the hospital with him. I was 2 then. At the ripe, much more mature age of 4, I guess I thought another little brother would allow me to be the ONLY girl, which would be a wonderful promotion in the family unit. So...when my mother came home with a skinny, red faced, screaming mess wrapped in pink, I was very disappointed. Turns out, I had convinced myself she was a boy and even made up the name choice, because my parents tell me now that everyone knew all along she was a girl. Hmm...that's one jealous 4 year old, huh?

Kelly H. said...

I'm catching up from celebrating my son's 10th birthday this week, so I'm posting late. Childhood is full of anticipation, and I could relate to so many of the other stories. Anticipation of Christmas surprises, first days of school, and the births of my beloved siblings is still very vivid in my mind. I will add one more. I loved summer camp. Day camp, CEF camp, church camp, the Wilds, cheerleading camp...you name it, I loved going. I would imagine the fun and new friends for many weeks ahead of time. I would also put my suitcase at the end of my bed and pack at least two weeks early.

Lisa said...

Anticipate... A memory related to anticipate...
SNOW! Just thinking about the word brings happiness and joy to me. I remember huge snows growing up. Being able to stay home from school, bundling up, snowball fights, and hot chocolate. I grew up on a dairy farm, so snow meant daddy would have time to spend with us, could play with us, and just enjoy being able to rest for a moment. I'll never forget one winter the snow was heavy and downed power lines. We had a generator in the dairy barn to run the milkers, but at the house it was a camp-out in the basement. We stayed warm using a wood stove and slept on pallets. My mom would make pancakes on the wood stove and we would play outside till our faces were numb, come in to warm and do it all over again. I know it was a struggle for adults going without electricity for days; but to me as a kid, it was fabulous winter adventure.

Kimberly Hoyt said...

What a delightful memory you brought back for me! It was the same in our house: a few new outfits at the start of the school year, maybe one or two for Christmas, and definitely a new Easter outfit. I remember the excitement of FINALLY being allowed to choose some of my own clothes, starting with the Easter I was ten.

Anticipation for Christmas was always a biggie for me. I was born in early December, and I always asked that we set up and decorate the tree on my birthday. We had one of those shiny silver ones with the light that changed from red to green to blue to yellow. Remember those? I'd sit enchanted by the changing colors for hours.

I always anticipated the start of school each year; not only because I enjoyed learning, but mainly because we got new school supplies! Is there anything better than the smell and feel of new paper, pencils, crayons, books... I still get a little giddy in the office supply store :)

Lanette said...

Lanette King Breeden Day 2 ANTICIPATE...Well, just as I anticipated, I'm behind on my memories journal BUT it is important enough to me to not drop this project like I do so many other things in life that really matter to me. Too many times the pulls of so many other things cause me to cut myself short but not this time. The word anticipate brought back one of my fondest memories and it felt as if I was standing right back in that time and spot in my life...WHAT JOY IT BROUGHT REMEMBERING. I always loved horses of all kinds. I dreamed of horses and always admired the beauty they have. This love for horses followed me on into my teenage years and even into my twenties. I was 15 years old when I learned of a new type of horse that I loved even more than my original love of horses and that was HORSEPOWER. I went with a friend to the movies and her stepmom drove us in her Mustang GT. I was always an adrenaline junkie for roller coasters, etc. As soon as she hit the gas and my head was pinned to the back of the seat, I was in LOVE I told my Dad that I really wanted a Mustang GT and this brings me to the moment of anticipation. This was before cell phones. There I stood in the sliding glass window, looking over the carport anticipating the moment my Dad would drive up in that Mustang GT to see if I liked it. Did I like it???? I LOVED it. My Dad bought me that car and I spent many years to follow making many fond memories in that car. Of course, I drove way too fast, with the radio way too loud and the T-tops out. Fun remembering the carefree days of youth. When I met my husband many years later, he asked what some of my favorite things were. I answered, I love to hear the clip clip of a horses hooves through a creek and the loud revving of a Mustang GT. To this day, if I pass a Mustang GT, I roll my window down and listen to the hum of that engine.💕💕

Audra Picarello said...

I'm a little behind on this one - took me a few days to think of what I anticipated as a kid. I anticipated the time spent at my grandparents over the weekend. Playing dressup in the basement, listening to records my dad and uncle had when they were kids, seeing Grandpa's garden, and eating grits and eggs for breakfast were things I loved and anticipated :)

Lyle said...

The first day of school. Strapping on my backpack laden with blank notebooks and paper, ready to be filled with the year's assignments. Pencils and erasers, crayons and a bottle of glue jostling as I walked the quarter of a mile dusty lane from our farm to where the bus would make its stop. My heart beating quickly as I wondered what my new teacher would be like, if I would get to sit in a desk near one of my friends, if I would have the courage to raise my hand and tell the teacher to please call me by my nickname "Lyle," and not the name Elizabeth, printed so plainly on the roll. I can still see the desks in rows in the classrooms, remember the unique smell of the halls of Pleasant Valley Elementary, the taste of Mrs. Shull's homemade rolls in the cafeteria, the feel of the vinyl bus seats, and the sound of my best friend Yolanda's laugh.

Kathy Wiedemann said...

Day 2 Anticipate
This is a tough one for me. However, a happy memory that I do remember anticipating is SNOW! That meant spending hours outside with my friends sledding on the giant hill behind our home in Germany. There was no such thing as a “snow day” in Germany. I can remember trudging to class in snow that was literally knee-deep. We would watch it falling outside our classroom windows all day while we feverishly sent notes back and forth making our plans for after that final bell rang. I lived on the hill above our elementary/middle school complex. That meant the sleds always ended up on the playground at the bottom…sledding off a slide can be great if you balance it just right. We would stay outside until all four pairs of jeans were soaked through and our toes were numb. My mother would always have it timed just perfectly so that the hot chocolate (with marshmallows, of course) was ready when we finally decided the pain in our fingers and ice on our noses was enough for the day. While we were defrosting, she would always mix up a giant bowl of snow-crème! Best treat of the entire winter! We ate so much of that stuff while we lived in Germany I should’ve turned into a vanilla bean!
To this day, I still anticipate snow like a five year old waits on Santa! I love everything about it: The chance to slow down. The chance to just stop and listen to the silence of God’s Creation. The promise of new life springing forth after the death of winter. The sound of boots plodding up a hill dragging a sled. The plume of hot breath from a horse’s nose against that backdrop of white. The pleasure of being re-warmed after being so cold. The opportunity to act like a kid again…and to enjoy doing that with my own kids! Building a fort and stockpiling ammo for the impending snowball battle. Quirky snowmen…or anything else created from the fluff. The beauty of all the rough edges of the landscape being softened, if only for a day. Cuddling with my sweetie with a mug of hot soup. The perfect excuse to drink hot chocolate with a gazillion tiny marshmallows and whipped cream with a dash of cinnamon! And, of course, making snow-crème for my family.